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Just a wannabe movie critic, bibliophile, and amateur photographer. I love Abraham Lincoln, typewriters, classic films and cameras. Stanford Class of 2018! Supposedly part of The History Peeps...

FOLLOW ME on Instagram @queridachalina

savanaugh:

I AM ON A MISSION. I AM GOING TO FOLLOW EVERY FUCKING BLOG ON THIS SITE. ALL OF THEM. HELP ME ACHIEVE THIS GOAL, INTERNET STRANGERS, BY REBLOGGING THIS POST AND I WILL FOLLOW ALL WHO REBLOG IT. E V E R Y O N E.

I want to change my username and I asked my little sister what she thinks I should change it to and her immediate response was “Sonic Potato” and she thinks it’s an awesome idea because my icon could be a potato with sonic the hedgehog hair.

  1. Go to the HONY tumblr. or Facebook page
  2. Scroll through the archive or timeline photos
  3. Smile

nubbsgalore:

six year old anita and twelve year old sonia, sisters, were both born blind to parents who, as field labourers making less than a dollar a day, were unable to afford the 300 dollar, fifteen minute operation that would restore their sight. 

for such children, blindness is often a death sentence. unable to read or find work, most leave their villages to spend their lives homeless, asking for money in the streets (much like with this photo). 

but with the help of 20/20/20, a non profit which seeks to provide the surgery for the approximately twenty million in need, sonia and anita were successfully treated, with their defective opaque lenses replaced with functional artificial ones. 

said anita’s mother, “when they removed the bandages, she kept saying ‘mother, i can see! i can see!’” as 20/20/20 explains, “it is an amazing experience to watch a child open their eyes and see for the first time. some gasp, some cry. some are too stunned to do anything except look around them and take it all in.”

you can watch a short, but impactful, documentary on anita and sonia, which includes the touching footage of the sisters seeing for the first time. photos from a larger series by brent stirton. click picture for more on their story from said doc. (see also: india’s dalits)

twowhovianhearts:

jacksgettingfitter:

This is my nephew. Just in case it escaped your attention, he is dressed as Belle from Beauty and the Beast.Yesterday I was out for lunch with some of my family, including my nephew who I hadn’t seen for a few months. He was very excited to see me and I was him.As soon as we sat in the restaurant, he started pulling out some princess figurines (which he had amusingly named Rihanna and Gaga), and he was explaining to me how beautiful they were. He told me he wished he could be as beautiful as them even though he was a boy.This kind of comment was nothing new for him.After we all started eating, I noticed he was facing away from us. He turned around with a tear rolling down his cheek and refused to say what was wrong. This was very out of character for him. He was usually so attention seeking and theatrical, and incredibly intelligent for his age.After a while he put his head into his arms on the table and started crying a lot more. I leaned into him and asked what was wrong again.He whispered really quietly to me “I don’t want to be weird.”I responded to him saying “Weird? I’m weird. Weird is good, weird is different!”"But I don’t want to be different, it’s wrong," he replied through tear-stained fingers.Angry, I started “Let me tell you what’s wrong. You are five years old and people are already telling you what you should and shouldn’t say. Or what you should and shouldn’t wear. You’re crying because somebody decided what boys are supposed to do and what girls are supposed to do, and nobody should differ from that. Well, let me tell you a little something about normal…It used to be normal to laugh at people because they had different coloured skin. It used to be normal to bully somebody if they were a boy and they loved another boy, or a girl who loved another girl. It used to be normal to pick on someone for being too fat or too skinny. It used to be normal to pick on different, and the worst part is that a lot of that stuff is still going on.Why would you want to be normal, you’re extraordinary! If anybody tells you that you can’t be a beautiful princess, you put on that fucking dress because you are beautiful and you are a little weird, but nobody normal ever made a fucking bit of difference in the world. You wear whatever the hell you want, and like whatever the hell you like, because it’s people like you that are going to make a real, lasting change.
The world needs a lot more weird and a lot less normal.”And he understood exactly what I meant. He lunged in for a hug and kissed me on the cheek before uttering under his breath “What does ‘fucking’ mean?”I love that kid more than I’ve ever loved anything. Don’t make his generation fight our battles. Shaming of every variety needs to end now, we should be celebrating different, not condemning it. Not just for society as it is now, but for society as it will be.How many more tears do we need our children to cry?

YOU ARE A HERO AND I LOVE YOU

twowhovianhearts:

jacksgettingfitter:

This is my nephew. Just in case it escaped your attention, he is dressed as Belle from Beauty and the Beast.

Yesterday I was out for lunch with some of my family, including my nephew who I hadn’t seen for a few months. He was very excited to see me and I was him.

As soon as we sat in the restaurant, he started pulling out some princess figurines (which he had amusingly named Rihanna and Gaga), and he was explaining to me how beautiful they were. He told me he wished he could be as beautiful as them even though he was a boy.

This kind of comment was nothing new for him.

After we all started eating, I noticed he was facing away from us. He turned around with a tear rolling down his cheek and refused to say what was wrong. This was very out of character for him. He was usually so attention seeking and theatrical, and incredibly intelligent for his age.

After a while he put his head into his arms on the table and started crying a lot more. I leaned into him and asked what was wrong again.

He whispered really quietly to me “I don’t want to be weird.”

I responded to him saying “Weird? I’m weird. Weird is good, weird is different!”

"But I don’t want to be different, it’s wrong," he replied through tear-stained fingers.

Angry, I started “Let me tell you what’s wrong. You are five years old and people are already telling you what you should and shouldn’t say. Or what you should and shouldn’t wear. You’re crying because somebody decided what boys are supposed to do and what girls are supposed to do, and nobody should differ from that. Well, let me tell you a little something about normal…

It used to be normal to laugh at people because they had different coloured skin. It used to be normal to bully somebody if they were a boy and they loved another boy, or a girl who loved another girl. It used to be normal to pick on someone for being too fat or too skinny. It used to be normal to pick on different, and the worst part is that a lot of that stuff is still going on.

Why would you want to be normal, you’re extraordinary! If anybody tells you that you can’t be a beautiful princess, you put on that fucking dress because you are beautiful and you are a little weird, but nobody normal ever made a fucking bit of difference in the world. You wear whatever the hell you want, and like whatever the hell you like, because it’s people like you that are going to make a real, lasting change.


The world needs a lot more weird and a lot less normal.”

And he understood exactly what I meant. He lunged in for a hug and kissed me on the cheek before uttering under his breath “What does ‘fucking’ mean?”

I love that kid more than I’ve ever loved anything. Don’t make his generation fight our battles.

Shaming of every variety needs to end now, we should be celebrating different, not condemning it. Not just for society as it is now, but for society as it will be.
How many more tears do we need our children to cry?





YOU ARE A HERO AND I LOVE YOU

humansofnewyork:

Seen in Jamaica, Queens.

humansofnewyork:

Seen in Jamaica, Queens.

-teesa-:

7.23.14

George Takei describes the moment when he and his family were sent to an internment camp.